Month: June 2015

Adventure Time: Prague, Czech Republic

SelfiePrague in pictures!

Alright folks, I’m writing this from my apartment in Madrid (It’s our last day here), and it’s currently 100 degrees (literally), so let’s keep this one short and sweet.

CollageBridge* These two pictures are from the famous Charles Bridge, it’s pretty cool and no cars can go on it

* This was where we saw a momma dog and her 12 very little puppies (cue Shannon meltdown)

* It’s also lined with these really weird statues that I think are derived from Catholicism CollageCastle*So I was really excited because Prague has a “castle,” but it turns out the castle is just a lot of houses built around a beautiful cathedral #woeismeCollagedessert

* Prague has this traditional sweet that’s like a hollow churro, we opted for a chocolate-filled one

* Funny story: we ordered a chocolate-filled one which turned out to be a regular one and a packet of nutella we had to spread on ourselvesCollageFood

*Prague food is all alarmingly similar (and delicious)

*Most dishes are some type of meat with sauce, potato dumplings, and that’s allCollageMarket

*We stumbled across a market where there were lots of pretty trinkets

* How cool is Czech money?!

CollageOldTown

*Prague has a super dope Old Town Square

* All of the buildings are pastel colored with pointy tips (I’m sure there’s a technical term for this architecture, but I’m feelin too lazy to look it up)

* This is an astronomical clock that not only tells the time, but also the date, and the position of the moon LOverlook SOverlooks

And ya esta! Our next adventure is homeward *TOMORROW!*

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Adventure Time: Dublin, Ireland

Jameson1

As many of you can imagine, Logan and I kind of have this traveling thing down to a “T”. We’ve realized we are kind of lazy people when we travel, I mean it’s still our weekend so we want some time to chill, and explore a new city. So throughout the year we have somehow perfected the way to see most of any city in 48 hours (give or take) while still leaving the house at 11, taking a nap, and down-right chillin’.

Since Dublin doesn’t have tons of sights to see, we stuck to our three main pillars of travel: food, booze, and wandering.

1. Food

pub

I don’t actually have any pictures of the food we ate, I guess we were so hungry we just kinda gobbled it all up #sorrynotsorry. The food is what you would expect. Excellent meat, burgers, pies, and lots of potatoes. Oh, and I can’t forget my favorite Irish delicacy: CADBURY CHOCOLATE PRODUCTS!

2. Booze

Jameson2

beeeer

Dublin knows their way around the alcohol department. I give this city an A+ on that front. We went on a tour of the Jameson Whiskey HQ where we were taught the whiskey making process, given free samps, and able to admire the various Jameson DIY bottle decor they have throughout the place. We also had our fair share of Irish beer (yummm), and went to plenty of Irish pubs.

3. Wandering

wander1

college

Dublin was cold. Like really, really cold (60 degrees). I think Spain has made me a softy to any weather that’s less than sunny with a high of 95. Dublin felt like winter to us, but we still wandered throughout the entire city. Logan and I made some stops at the Dublin Castle, Trinity College, and the Temple Bar.

Well we have one more adventure time to tell you about, and then we are homeward bound!

Lessons Learned From a First Year ESL Teacher

1. Creativity is key

imagination

Did you ever have a teacher who exclusively taught from an outdated, horribly written textbook + workbook combo? I did. And do you know what I learned from them? NOTHING. I’ve learned that classes should be really fun and engaging and as a teacher you should always try to make it seem like a different form of entertainment. Any subject can be interesting if you sprinkle some creativity into it. (I once made a dating game to practice physical description words)

2. Teaching is exhausting

Exhausting

As a student you don’t fully comprehend or even try to understand the effort your teacher is making. Your job as a student is to sit, listen, and learn. Your job as a teacher is to facilitate, present, listen, ask 1 billion questions, get everyone involved, try to be creative, manage the classroom, I could keep going but I think you get the drift.

3. Don’t underestimate your audience

audience

Just to clue you in, in my classes I talk in English 100% of the time. Even with my super young students (5year olds), and they can still understand what I want them to do. They can follow directions, and even answer a lot of questions. It’s easy to disregard small kids’ intelligence, but I wouldn’t.

4. Things will go wrong, learn to BS

BS

How many times was the Internet down, my PowerPoint was broken, or an activity I planned didn’t take up the whole class period? More than once. But thinking on your toes is essential in teaching. I learned to BS my way through a class period by playing a random game, thinking of a last minute activity, or resorting to asking tons of questions.

5. Become fluent in body language

body language

It is SO easy to tell when students (or any audience) is not interested in what you are saying or doing. When you notice people’s eyes starting to glaze over, you have to switch it up and be a bit creative (refer to lesson 1). Don’t just keep doing what you’re doing because it’s obviously super boring.

So I know most of you aren’t ESL teachers, but I think the lessons I’ve learned as a teacher can be applied to any career field. Being creative and adaptable, knowing your audience, and thinking on your feet are invaluable skills for anyone.